Instagram filters…continued.

13 Dec

Personal observations:

Through my own observations at looking at the filters I have related some of the filters appearance to aesthetics that I am familiar with, for example:

  • Nashville: captures the appearance of Fuji’s Velvia (RVP) slide film, it includes the rebate of the film, showing it as a whole.
  • Lomo-fi: captures photographs with extremely high light sensitivity, creating bright coloured images. Mimicking the Lomography phenomenon.
  • Inkwell: could possibly mimic black and white polaroid photographs.
  • X-pro II: mimics X-pro film, which makes everything more vibrant and vivid.
  • 1977 and Toaster: inhabit the aesthetics of 70s photographs and Kodachrome film appearances. With it’s vivid colours and dreamy qualities.
The photographs produced on Instagram are always of a square format. This copies the 6x6cm film appearance of medium format analogue film.
I did some research into the names of the Instagram filters and came across a website (http://1000memories.com/blog/97-old-school-instagram-filters-using-vintage-cameras-and-film), which listed some of the filters and how they mimicked analogue aesthetics. Listing the camera and film used to gain the look.
The list above analyses the original Instagram filters, however, because it seeks to stay up to date some of the filters got axed and some got added. But the majority of the filters above are still used in the App. But it gives you a real sense as to the notions in which Instagram are trying to mimic.

Because I wasn’t too sure about why some of the filters are called what they are I decided to e-mail the Instagram company and ask them why the filters have their names and whether they mimicked an aesthetic in particular. If anyone was going to now, it’ll be them! I e-mailed saying:

Having sent this e-mail, I promptly received a reply saying:

The e-mail pointed me into the direction of two separate web-links corresponding to a website Quora. One link answered to some degree as to why they name their filters what they do:

And the other link replied in ways of describing how they develop the filters:

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